KABUKI GLOSSARY (K)
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Kabuki Jűhachiban
 

A collection of 18 plays of the Ichikawa Danjűr˘ line of actors, selected by Ichikawa Ebiz˘ V in 1840 as the most representative plays in aragoto style:

Play First performance First performer
"Fuwa" 3rd lunar month of 1680 Ichikawa Danjűr˘ I
"Narukami" 1st lunar month of 1684 Ichikawa Danjűr˘ I
"Shibaraku" 1st lunar month of 1697 Ichikawa Danjűr˘ I
"Fud˘" 5th lunar month of 1697 Ichikawa Kuz˘ I
"Uwanari" 7th lunar month of 1699 Ichikawa Danjűr˘ I
"Z˘hiki" 1st lunar month of 1701 Ichikawa Danjűr˘ I
"Kanjinch˘" 2nd lunar month of 1702 Ichikawa Danjűr˘ I
"Sukeroku" 4th lunar month of 1713 Ichikawa Danjűr˘ II
"Uir˘ Uri" 1st lunar month of 1718 Ichikawa Danjűr˘ II
"Oshimodoshi" 3rd lunar month of 1727 Ichikawa Danjűr˘ II
"Ya-no-Ne" 1st lunar month of 1729 Ichikawa Danjűr˘ II
"Kagekiyo" 9th lunar month of 1732 Ichikawa Danjűr˘ II
"Kan'u" 11th lunar month of 1737 Ichikawa Danjűr˘ II
"Nanatsu Men" 2nd lunar month of 1740 Ichikawa Danjűr˘ II
"Kenuki" 1st lunar month of 1742 Ichikawa Danjűr˘ II
"Gedatsu" 3rd lunar month of 1760 Ichikawa Danjűr˘ IV
"Ja Yanagi" 5th lunar month of 1763 Ichikawa Danjűr˘ IV
"Kamahige" 1st lunar month of 1769 Ichikawa Danjűr˘ IV

The number 18 is symbolic, many of these plays are seldom performed and some fell into oblivion. The most famous and performed ones are "Kanjinch˘" (performed several times a year), "Narukami" (at least once a year), "Shibaraku", "Ya-no-Ne" and "Sukeroku" (these 3 plays are usually performed to celebrate great events like shűmei). The plays "Kenuki" and "Uir˘ Uri" are also frequently performed. The 11 remaining plays may be revived by the National Theatre ("Z˘hiki", "Fűd˘", "Gedatsu", "Kagekiyo") or the troupe led by Ichikawa Ennosuke III ("Kamahige").

In Japanese: 歌舞伎十八番

Kabuki Sandai Meisaku Ky˘gen
 

Literally the three most important Kabuki masterpieces: "Kanadehon Chűshingura", "Yoshitsune Sembon Zakura" and "Sugawara Denju Tenarai Kagami".

In Japanese: 歌舞伎三大名作狂言

Kaei
 

An imperial era in Japanese history which started the 28th day of the 2nd lunar month of 1848 (the 1st of April 1848 in the western calendar) and ended the 27th day of the 11th lunar month of its 7th year (the 15th of January 1855 in the western calendar). The 2 eras before and after Kaei were K˘ka and Ansei.

In Japanese: 嘉永

Kaga
 

Old province, which grosso modo corresponds to the southern part of the Ishikawa Prefecture today [more details].

In Japanese: 加賀

Kagamiyamamono
 

Dramas dealing with a famous suicide/revenge story involving three palace ladies-in-waiting: one lady, who was humiliated by the terrible z˘riuchi done by a senior lady-in-waiting, committed suicide. Her death was avenged by her faithful servant, who killed the senior lady-in-waiting. The first kagamiyamamono in Kabuki history was the play "Kagamiyama Koky˘ no Nishikie".

In Japanese: 加賀見山物

Kagaya
 

Guild name (yag˘) for Nakamura T˘z˘, Nakamura Kaishun and Nakamura Matsue [more details].

In Japanese: 加賀屋

Kagebara
 

A hidden seppuku: the hero, who has already committed seppuku, hides his belly cut with the outer garnment of his costum.

In Japanese: 陰腹

Kagekiyomono
 

Play whose main characters are the defeated warrior Taira no Kagekiyo (called Akushichiby˘e Kagekiyo), his lover Akoya, Hatakeyama Shigetada and Mionoya Shir˘ Kunitoshi. Two good examples of kagekiyomono are "Kagekiyo" and "Akoya".

In Japanese: 景清物

Kago
 

A palanquin.

In Japanese: 駕籠

Kagokaki
 

A palanquin bearer.

In Japanese: 駕籠舁

Kai
 

Old province, which grosso modo corresponds to the current prefecture of Yamanashi. It was also called K˘shű.

In Japanese: 甲斐

Kaibary˘
 

Literally the "hay money". The tip paid by an actor, who has to ride a Kabuki horse (uma) on stage, to the two assistants doing the horse.

In Japanese: かいば料

Kaidanmono
 

A ghost play.

In Japanese: 怪談物

Kakegoe
 

Words of praise shouted by connoisseurs from the audience, at key moments in a dance or a drama, like a mie, a stage entrance or a pose on the shichisan. Usually these words are either the actor yag˘ or his generation number. These days, only positive shouting is done but in the good old days, it was also possible to insult bad actors, using the infamous word daikon.

In Japanese: 掛け声

Kakikae Ky˘gen
 

A rewritten Kabuki drama. During the Edo period, a kakikae ky˘gen was a newly-created drama based on an existing famous older drama. Here are some examples: "Kamikakete Sango Taisetsu" (based on "Godairiki Koi no Fűjime"), "Kurotegumi Kuruwa no Tatehiki" (based on "Sukeroku") or "Gonichi no Iwafuji" (based on "Kagamiyama"). The newly-created drama could be more realistic or more spectacular than the original ones. It could also be a kind of parody of the old one. The male hero in the old drama could also become a female heroin, like in "Onna Shibaraku" (based on "Shibaraku") or in "Onna Narukami" (based on "Narukami").

In Japanese: 書替狂言

Kak˘shű
 

A special collection of roles gathered by the star Ichimura Uzaemon XV:

  • Gosho no Goroz˘ ("Soga Moy˘ Tateshi no Goshozome")
  • Hayano Kampei ("Kanadehon Chűshingura")
  • Igami no Gonta ("Sushiya")
  • Kajiwara Heiz˘ Kagetoki ("Ishikiri Kajiwara")
  • Kataoka Naojir˘ ("Naozamurai")
  • Omatsuri Sashichi ("Edo Sodachi Omatsuri Sashichi")
  • Sait˘ Bett˘ Sanemori ("Sanemori Monogatari")
  • Sasaki Moritsuna ("Moritsuna Jin'ya")
  • Shirai Gompachi ("Suzu-ga-Mori")
  • Sukeroku ("Sukeroku")
  • Togashi ("Kanjinch˘")
  • Yosabur˘ ("Kirare Yosa")
  • In Japanese: 可江集

    Kamakuragashi
     

    A famous district in Edo in Kanda. The name gashi means river bank and Kamakura came from the adjacent district, Kamakura-ch˘, not directly from the 12th century capital of the Shogunate. Kamakuragashi was a famous river front market during the Edo period, one of the 73 river front markets in Edo, which was specialized in lumber. The Toshimaya, a shirozake brewery at Kanda Kamakuragashi, was also extremely popular.

    In Japanese: 鎌倉河岸

    Kamakura Jidai
     

    The Kamakura era. A period of Japanese history that marks the governance by the Kamakura Shogunate, officially established in 1192 in Kamakura by the first Sh˘gun Minamoto no Yoritomo. It ended in 1333 with the destruction of the Shogunate [more details].

    In Japanese: 鎌倉時代

    Kambu
     

    Literally the top management (of a company). In Kabuki, this is the close circle of top actors. The majority of kambu actors, the lucky ones, are in this circle since their hatsubutai thanks to their birth within the Kabuki world. A minority is made up of actors, who were born outside but were so talented and hard-working that they deserved to join the first league.

    In Japanese: 幹部

    Kambu Sh˘shin
     

    The promotion to kambu for a nadai actor.

    In Japanese: 幹部昇進

    Kame
     

    A tortoise.

    In Japanese:

    Kameyama-juku
     

    Kameyama-juku or Kameyama-shuku. The 46th (from Edo) of the 53 shukuba (post station) on the T˘kaid˘. Kameyama was also a castle town. 412.7 km from Edo and 78.5 km from Ky˘to [more details].

    In Japanese: 亀山宿

    Kamiarai
     

    The wild tossing of the long hair of a shishi wig in the climax of a Lion Dance (like "Aioi Jishi", "Kagami Jishi" or "Renjishi"). The litteral meaning of kamiarai is "hair-washing".

    In Japanese: 髪洗い

    Kamigata Kabuki
     

    The Kabuki of Kamigata (old expression used for the ďsaka-Ky˘to-K˘be-Nara region) The Kamigata Kabuki main feature is the wagoto style. Nowadays, there are only a few Kamigata actors, led by the star Nakamura Ganjir˘ and his two sons Senjaku and Kanjaku. The others famous Kamigata actors are Kataoka Hidetar˘, Band˘ Takesabur˘ and Kamimura Kichiya, who are still living in the city of ďsaka. Some actors like Kataoka Nizaemon, Kataoka Gat˘ or Nakamura Tomijűr˘, born and educated in T˘ky˘, living in T˘ky˘, are also related to Kamigata Kabuki because of their lineage.

    In Japanese: 上方歌舞伎

    Kamigata-mai
     

    Buy˘ dances created in Kamigata. The most famous school of Kamigata-mai is the Yamamura School, which was created by Yamamura Tomogor˘, the choreographer of the star Nakamura Nakamura Utaemon III, during the Bunka era.

    In Japanese: 上方舞

    Kamiko
     

    A paper kimono. "Originally, kamiko meant a shabby kimono made by pasting scraps of washi (Japanese paper) together, but as a Kabuki costume, the kamiko is stylized using black silk crepe on which parts of love letters, etc., are embroidered with gold and silver thread [more details].

    In Japanese: 紙子 / 紙衣

    Kaminari
     

    Thunder.

    In Japanese:

    Kamisuki
     

    Gentle love scene in which the actor woman, played by an onnagata, combs the hair of her lover while expressing all her love for him.

    In Japanese: 髪梳

    Kamite
     

    Stage left. The right of the stage from the audience viewpoint. [=> shimote].

    In Japanese: 上手

    Kamite Agemaku
     

    Agemaku to allow entrance from the kamite.

    In Japanese: 上手揚幕

    Kamiyui
     

    An old Edo period word for hairdresser. It literally means "hair-tying".

    In Japanese: 髪結

    Kamon
     

    A family crest.

    In Japanese: 家紋

    Kampaku
     

    A high-ranking court title, which was held by the chief advisor for an adult emperor. A possible translation is regent. The kampaku was considered as the highest bureaucrat in the imperial court. It was created by Fujiwara no Mototsune for himself in 887, when the Fujiwara clan effectively ruled over Japan, treating the emperor as a mere powerless puppet. The position was traditionally occupied by somebody from the Fujiwara clan up to the 16th century , when two non-Fujiwara held it, Toyotomi Hideyoshi and his son in law Toyotomi Hidetsugu.

    In Japanese: 関白

    Kamp˘
     

    An imperial era in Japanese history which started the 27th day of the 2nd lunar month of 1741 (the 12th of April 1741 in the western calendar) and ended the 21st day of the 2nd lunar month of 1744 (the 3rd of April 1744 in the western calendar). The 2 eras before and after Kamp˘ were Genbun and Enky˘.

    In Japanese: 寛保

    Kamuro
     

    Young girl attendant for a high-ranking courtesan (keisei).

    In Japanese: 禿

    Kanagawa-juku
     

    Kanagawa-juku or Kanagawa-shuku. The 3rd (from Edo) of the 53 shukuba (post station) on the T˘kaid˘. 28 km from Edo and 463.2 km from Ky˘to [more details].

    In Japanese: 神奈川宿

    Kanaya-juku
     

    Kanaya-juku or Kanaya-shuku. The 24th (from Edo) of the 53 shukuba (post station) on the T˘kaid˘. 213 km from Edo and 278.2 km from Ky˘to [more details].

    In Japanese: 金谷宿

    Kanbun
     

    An imperial era in Japanese history which started the 25th day of the 4th lunar month of 1661 (the 23rd of May 1661 in the western calendar) and ended the 21st day of the 9th lunar month of 1673 (the 30th of October 1673 in the western calendar). The 2 eras before and after Kanbun were Manji and Enp˘.

    In Japanese: 寛文

    Kanda Matsuri
     

    One of the most important matsuri in the city of T˘ky˘ (it is one of the "Three Great Festivals of Edo"). The present day festival was established in the Edo period and is still held every year in the middle of May around the Kanda My˘jin Shrine in Soto-Kanda in the district of Chiyoda [more details].

    In Japanese: 神田祭

    Kanda My˘jin
     

    One of the most famous Shint˘ shrines in T˘ky˘. It is located in Soto-Kanda in the district of Chiyoda [more details].

    In Japanese: 神田明神

    Kand˘
     

    Disinheritance; disownment.

    In Japanese: 勘当

    Kan'ei
     

    An imperial era in Japanese history which started the 30th day of the 2nd lunar month of 1624 (the 17th of April 1624 in the western calendar) and ended the 16th day of the 12th lunar month of the 21st year of the Kan'ei era (the 13th of January 1645 in the western calendar). The 2 eras before and after Kan'ei were Genna and Sh˘h˘.

    In Japanese: 寛永

    Kan'en
     

    An imperial era in Japanese history which started the 12th day of the 7th lunar month of 1748 (the 5th of August 1748 in the western calendar) and ended the 27th day of the 10th lunar month of 1751 (the 14th of December 1751 in the western calendar). The 2 eras before and after Kan'en were Enky˘ and H˘reki.

    In Japanese: 寛延

    Kaneru Yakusha
     

    Talented actor able to perform any kind of roles (onnagata, tachiyaku, katakiyaku). The first kaneru yakusha in Kabuki history were Nakamura Utaemon III and Onoe Kikugor˘ III.

    In Japanese: 兼ねる役者

    Kanjiku
     

    Title awarded on a honorary basis to the best actor in each section of a hy˘banki.

    In Japanese: 巻軸

    Kanjinch˘
     

    A subscription list.

    In Japanese: 勧進帳

    Kanjo
     

    A court lady.

    In Japanese: 官女

    Kannon
     

    The Goddess of Mercy.

    In Japanese: 観音

    Kannushi
     

    A Shint˘ priest.

    In Japanese: 神主

    Kanoko Mochi
     

    A rice cake with sweet boiled beans inside.

    In Japanese: 鹿の子餅

    Kansai
     

    A region in Japan, which includes the prefectures of Nara, Wakayama, Mie, Ky˘to, ďsaka, Hy˘go and Shiga.

    In Japanese: 関西

    Kansei
     

    An imperial era in Japanese history which started the 25th day of the 1st lunar month of 1789 (the 19th of February 1789 in the western calendar) and ended the 5th day of the 2nd lunar month of 1801 (the 19th of March 1801 in the western calendar). The 2 eras before and after Kansei were Tenmei and Ky˘wa.

    In Japanese: 寛政

    Kantsűmono
     

    Kabuki dramas whose main theme is adultery (kantsű in Japanese). In the Tokugawa legal code, adultery was a serious crime, which was punishable by death. The drama "Yari no Gonza" is a good example of kantsűmono.

    In Japanese: 姦通物

    Kanzen Ch˘aku
     

    The Confucian principle of "encouraging good and chastising evil".

    In Japanese: 勧善徴悪

    Kaomise
     

    During the Edo period, a kaomise was the "face-showing" ceremony of a theater, which celebrated the opening of the new theatrical year and its new troupe. It was generally held in November and was a very important event in Edo, ďsaka or Ky˘to. Nowadays, there are still 3 symbolic kaomise in Japan: at the Misonoza in October, at the Kabukiza in November and at the Minamiza in December.

    In Japanese: 顔見世

    Kaomise Banzuke
     

    In the Edo period, they were published to announce a theatre's newly engaged company, shortly before the annual eleventh-month production called the kaomise, which highlighted these actors, playwrights and musicians. In Edo, large, single sheet prints were used for the kaomise banzuke in the late Genroku period (1688~1704). The upper half of the print presents the crest of the management (yagura mon) in the center, and the engaged names of actors in the two column format on either side of it. The lower half depicts the acting company and the actors' faces or figures, drawn by Torii school artists. The actors' respective ranks are indicated by their position and size. ďsaka used large, single sheet banzuke, and Ky˘to used a long, horizontal sheet called the kiwamari banzuke or kompon kiwamari. Neither of these usually had pictures (from the Japanese Performing Arts Resource Center).

    In Japanese: 顔見世番付

    Kappa
     

    Legendary flesh-eating creature inhabiting ponds or rivers, hybrid of a human and a tortoise. The word kappa also means a traditional straw raincoat worn by farmers.

    In Japanese: 河童

    Kari-hanamichi
     

    A subsidiary hanamichi, which is occasionally built on the audience's right for specific dramas requiring the use of 2 hanamichi (the best example is "Yoshinogawa").

    In Japanese: 仮花道

    Kar˘
     

    The senior retainer of a daimy˘.

    In Japanese: 家老

    Kar˘ Ny˘b˘
     

    The spouse of a senior retainer.

    In Japanese: 家老女房

    Kasanemono
     

    Play whose main characters are the cursed and disfigured woman Kasane and her husband Yoemon, both from the Hanyű village. Yoemon kills Kasane with a sickle on the Kinugawa river bank, turning her into a vengeful ghost [more details].

    In Japanese: 累物

    Kashagata
     

    Term synonymous with fukeoyama, which fell into disuse.

    In Japanese: 花車方 (花車形)

    Kashű
     

    Old province, which grosso modo corresponds to the Eastern part of the current ďsaka Prefecture. It was also called Kawachi.

    In Japanese: 河州

    Kata
     

    A set of stylized forms designed for one specific role and transmitted from generation to generation.

    In Japanese:

    Katakiuchi
     

    In Japan feudal times, the samurai class upheld the honour of their family, clan, or lord through the practice of revenge killings (katakiuchi). These vendettas could also involve the relatives of an offender. It was a custom to ask local authorities for the permission to track down and take revenge upon the murderers. Synonym: adauchi.

    In Japanese: 敵討

    Katakiuchimono
     

    Katakiuchimono is a subgenre of Kabuki or puppet drama featuring a samurai revenge-killing vendetta (katakiuchi). The best examples are the sogamono based on the Soga Brothers vendetta. Synonim: adauchimono.

    In Japanese: 敵討物

    Katakiyaku
     

    Actor specialized in villain roles; a villain role.

    In Japanese: 敵役

    Katana
     

    A Japanese sword.

    In Japanese:

    Katana-kaji
     

    A swordsmith.

    In Japanese: 刀鍛冶

    Kataoka Jűnishű
     

    A special collection of roles gathered by the star Kataoka Nizaemon XI and transmitted to his heirs [more details].

    In Japanese: 片岡十二集

    Kat˘ Kiyomasa
     

    Kat˘ Kiyomasa, also called Toranosuke, was a Japanese daimy˘ of the Azuchi-Momoyama and Edo period. He was born the 25th of July 1562 in Nakamura in the Owari province. A relative of Toyotomi Hideyoshi, Kat˘ Kiyomasa entered his service upon reaching manhood and soon distinguished himself in battle. When Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea in 1592, Kat˘ Kiyomasa spearheaded the campaign and fought so ferociously that the Koreans nicknamed him "Devil Kiyomasa". Upon Hideyoshiĺs death in 1598, Kat˘ Kiyomasa returned to Japan and aided Tokugawa Ieyasu, who as chief regent to Hideyoshiĺs young son Toyotomi Hideyori. For his services, he received the Castle of Kumamoto as his provincial residence. He also brutally suppressed Christianity in Kyűshű. In his later years, he tried to work as a mediator for the increasingly complicated relationship between Tokugawa Ieyasu and Toyotomi Hideyori. In 1611, en route by sea to Kumamoto, he fell ill, and died shortly after his arrival. It was rumored that he was poisoned by Tokugawa Ieyasu. He died the 2nd of August 1611 [more details]. He became, under the thinly disguised name of Sat˘ Masakiyo, the hero of many Kabuki dramas, the most famous one being "Hachijin Shugo no Honj˘".

    In Japanese: 加藤清正

    Kat˘-kiyomasamono
     

    Kabuki dramas whose main character is the ruthless warrior Kat˘ Kiyomasa. In the Edo period, Kat˘ Kiyomasa always appeared on stage under the thinly disguised name of Sat˘ Masakiyo (or similar names) because of the Shogunate censorship. The best example of these dramas focusing on Sat˘ Masakiyo was "Hachijin Shugo no Honj˘". The best examples in Shinkabuki are the 4 dramas, written for Nakamura Kichiemon I who loved protraying Kat˘ Kiyomasa, belonging to the Shűzan Jisshu collection: "Nij˘j˘ no Kiyomasa", "Urusanj˘ no Kiyomasa", "Kumamotoj˘ no Kiyomasa" or "Kiyomasa Seichűroku".

    In Japanese: 加藤清正物

    Katsura
     

    A wig.

    In Japanese:

    Katsuragawa
     

    The Katsura River. This river flows near Ky˘to. It starts at the Togetsuky˘ Bridge in Arashiyama as the continuation of two other rivers, the Hozu and the ďi rivers, and flows until it joins the Kamo and Uji rivers [more details].

    In Japanese: 桂川

    Katsureki
     

    "Plays of Living History". New genre of jidaimono dramas, created by the star Ichikawa Danjűr˘ IX during the Meiji era.

    "These plays were enactments of historical incidents performed in every detail with all the accuracy that extensive research could reveal. Their popularity was moderate, and only Danjűr˘'s brilliant acting sustained them." (Faubion Bowers in "Japanese Theatre")

    The word katsureki is a contraction of the words katsu (action) and rekishi (history).

    In Japanese: 活歴

    Kawachi
     

    Old province, which grosso modo corresponds to the Eastern part of the current ďsaka Prefecture. It was also called Kashű.

    In Japanese: 河内

    Kawachiya
     

    Guild name (yag˘) for the Jitsukawa Enjaku line of actors [more details].

    In Japanese: 河内屋

    Kawanakajima no Tatakai
     

    A series of battles which took place during the Sengoku Period from 1553 to 1564. These battles were fought between Takeda Shingen, lord of the Kai province, and Uesugi Kenshin, lord of Echigo province [more details].

    In Japanese: 川中島の戦い

    Kawaramono
     

    Pejorative term used for Kabuki actors and meaning beggars (literally "riverbed people").

    In Japanese: 河原者

    Kawasaki-juku
     

    Kawasaki-juku or Kawasaki-shuku. The 2nd (from Edo) of the 53 shukuba (post station) on the T˘kaid˘. 18 km from Edo and 473.2 km from Ky˘to [more details].

    In Japanese: 川崎宿

    Keian
     

    An imperial era in Japanese history which started the 15th day of the 2nd lunar month of 1648 (the 7th of April 1648 in the western calendar) and ended the 18th day of the 9th lunar month of 1652 (the 20th of October 1652 in the western calendar). The 2 eras before and after Keian were Sh˘h˘ and J˘˘.

    In Japanese: 慶安

    Keian Jiken
     

    The Keian Uprising (jiken means incident in Japanese). A failed coup d'etat attempt masterminded by Yui Sh˘setsu and Marubashi Chűya and carried out against the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan in 1651, the 4th year of the Keian era, by a number of r˘nin [more details].

    In Japanese: 慶安事件

    Keich˘
     

    In Japanese history, the Keich˘ era is an imperial era which started the 27th day of the 10th lunar month of 1596 (the 16th of December 1596 in the western calendar) and ended the 13th day of the 7th lunar month of 1615 (the 5th of September 1615 in the western calendar). The era after Keich˘ was Genna.

    In Japanese: 慶長

    Kei˘
     

    In Japanese history, the Kei˘ period is an imperial era which started the 7th day of the 4th lunar month of 1865 (the 1st of May 1865 in the western calendar) and ended the 8th day of the 9th lunar month of 1868 (the 23rd of October 1868 in the western calendar). The 2 eras before and after Kei˘ were Genji and Meiji.

    In Japanese: 慶応

    Keisei
     

    High-ranking courtesan. The word keisei means literally "castle-destroyer". For more details on Japanese courtesan and their history, check immortalgeisha.com or the Geisha of Japan.

    In Japanese: 傾城 (契情)

    Keiseigoto
     

    A play with the pleasure quarters as background and a high-ranking courtesan (keisei) as main character.

    In Japanese: 傾城事

    Keiseikai
     

    Keiseikai or keiseigai, both reading are possible. Literally keisei-buying. A keiseikai is a Kamigata drama, whose main character is a young man who has fallen in love with a beautiful keisei and is desperately looking for the money to redeem her from her contract at her house of assignment in the pleasure quarter.

    In Japanese: 傾城買い

    Keiseimono
     

    A Kabuki dance with a pleasure quarter (kuruwa) as background and a high-ranking courtesan (keisei) as main character.

    In Japanese: 傾城物

    Kend˘
     

    "The way of the Sword". Kend˘ is the martial art of Japanese traditional fencing.

    In Japanese: 剣道

    Kenka
     

    A floral tribute.

    In Japanese: 献花

    Kenkyaku
     

    A fencer. A man who lived by the sword.

    In Japanese: 剣客

    Keren
     

    Generic term used for stage tricks like chűnori, hayagawari, yatai kuzushi or honmizu.

    "Rapid 'trick' appearances and disappearances of the actor are relatively few and are held in low esteem by the Kabuki connoisseur, who refers to them as keren (playing to the gallery)" (Earle Ernst in "The Kabuki Theatre", written in 1956, some years before the keren boom led by Ichikawa Ennosuke!).

    In Japanese: ケレン (外連)

    Keyari
     

    A feather-topped lance used by the footman (yakko) leading the travelling procession of his master.

    In Japanese: 毛槍

    Kigeki
     

    Kigeki is the Japanese translation of Comedy. This word was coined in 1901.

    In Japanese: 喜劇

    Kii
     

    Old province, which grosso modo corresponds to the current Wakayama prefecture and the southern part of the Mie prefecture. It was also called Kishű.

    In Japanese: 紀伊

    Kiju Kinen
     

    The traditional commemoration of one's seventy-seventh birthday.

    In Japanese: 喜寿記念

    Kijo
     

    An ogress; a female demon.

    In Japanese: 鬼女

    Kiku
     

    Chrysanthemum.

    In Japanese:

    Kikukichi
     

    The duo made up of Onoe Kikugor˘ VI and Nakamura Kichiemon I, which made from 1908 the success of the Ichimuraza, under the management of Tamura Nariyoshi, who had the brilliant idea to stimulate an artificial rivalry between the 2 young actors in order to make them surpass themselves, just like the dangiku duo of the Meiji era (a duo which was made up of Ichikawa Danjűr˘ IX and Onoe Kikugor˘ V). Onoe Kikugor˘ VI was the specialist of sewamono and Nakamura Kichiemon I was the specialist of jidaimono. The programs were mainly made up of gidayű ky˘gen or Kawatake Mokuami's masterpieces, helping for the preservation and transmission of many classics. This golden age lasted a little bit more than 10 years. A series of misfortunes hit the theater: the deaths of the onnagata Kawarazaki Kunitar˘ IV and Onoe Kikujir˘ III in 1919, the death of Tamura Nariyoshi in 1920 and ... Nakamura Kichiemon I leaving the Ichimuraza for the Sh˘chiku Company in 1921.

    In Japanese: 菊吉

    Kinkakuji
     

    The famous Golden Pavilion in Ky˘to.

    In Japanese: 金閣寺

    Kinokuniya
     

    Guild name (yag˘) for the actors Sawamura Tanosuke, Sawamura T˘jűr˘, Sawamura Tetsunosuke, Sawamura Yoshijir˘ and Sawamura S˘nosuke.

    In Japanese: 紀伊国屋

    Kinokuniya Bunzaemon
     

    Kinokuniya Bunzaemon (1669~1734) was a rich merchant in Edo. His trading house was specialized in citrus, lumber, and salmon among other goods. He was one of the biggest and most respected daijin in Edo history. His nickname was Kibun, Ki for Kinokuniya and Bun for Bunzaemon [more details].

    In Japanese: 紀伊國屋文左衛門

    Kinoshita T˘kichir˘
     

    The first name of the future Toyotomi Hideyoshi. He became, under the thinly disguised name of Konoshita T˘kichi, the hero of many Taik˘ki-related Kabuki dramas.

    In Japanese: 木下藤吉郎

    Kinpusanji
     

    The Kinpusanji Temple is an old and famous temple in Yoshinoyama [more details].

    In Japanese: 金峯山寺

    Kintar˘
     

    Kintar˘ is a folk hero from Japanese folklore. A child of superhuman strength, he was raised by the yamamba on Mount Ashigara. He became one of the four retainers (shitenn˘) of Minamoto Yorimitsu [more details].

    In Japanese: 金太郎

    Kiri
     

    It literally means "cut". This is the last scene of an act in the puppet theater (Bunraku). The word kiri was also used in Kabuki to nickname some famous scenes, like "Kawatsura H˘gen Yakata" in "Yoshitsune Sembon Zakura", which is nicknamed "Shi no Kiri" (shi means 4 in Japanese so shi no kiri means the kiri scene of the 4th act).

    In Japanese:

    Kiri Ky˘gen
     

    The kiri ky˘gen was originally a single-act afterpiece, which was performed at the end of the multi-act historical play (jidaimono). The expression was first used in Kamigata during the Genroku era and the single-act was a short sewamono drama, with characters and thema related to the sekai used in the jidaimono drama. Later, this drama became the nibanme (while the jidaimono was the ichibanme). The expression kiri ky˘gen was later used for a short dance ending a program. It is still used nowadays in the Kabuki world with the same meaning.

    In Japanese: 切狂言

    Kiseru
     

    A long-stemmed traditional Japanese pipe. One of the most important stage props in Kabuki.

    In Japanese: 煙管

    Kishű
     

    Old province, which was made up of the current Wakayama prefecture and the southern part of the Mie prefecture. It was also called Kii.

    In Japanese: 紀州

    Kiso Yoshinaka
     

    Minamoto no Yoshinaka (1154~1184), who was also called Kiso no Yoshinaka, was a general of the late Heian period, playing an important role during the wars between the Genji and the Heike clans. Returning to Ky˘to after a battle, Yoshinaka was angered to find out that the Emperor had sided with his cousin (and rival) Minamoto no Yoritomo. He extended military control over the city, pillaging it and forcing the Emperor to bestow upon him the title of Sh˘gun. Minamoto no Yoritomo, angry at Yoshinaka's actions, ordered his brothers Minamoto no Yoshitsune and Minamoto no Noriyori to attack and kill Yoshinaka. Yoshinaka was quickly defeated, driven out of Ky˘to and killed by his cousins at the Battle of Awazu in 1184 [more details].

    In Japanese: 木曾義仲

    Kitsune
     

    A fox.

    In Japanese:

    Kitsunebi
     

    Literally a fox fire. A Japanese will-o'-the-wisp.

    In Japanese: 狐火

    Kiyari Ondo
     

    A kiyari ondo was at the beginning a chant used by the lumber-carriers to bring good luck. It was also a custom for geisha dressed in tekomai to perform kiyari ondo during the major Edo festival. It can still be heard today at wedding ceremonies, celebrations for the completion of the framework of a building (house, shrine, ...) or some religious festivals.

    In Japanese: 木遣り音頭

    Kiyomizudera
     

    One of the most famous and beautiful temples in Ky˘to [more details].

    In Japanese: 清水寺

    Kiyomoto
     

    One style of narrative music, originating in the Tomimoto style, and created by Kiyomoto Enjudayű I in 1814. The current head of the Kiyomoto school is Kiyomoto Enjudayű VII.

    In Japanese: 清元

    Kizewamono
     

    Raw-life sewamono drama, depicting the lower strata of the Edo society. The hero is a thief, a gambler or a prostitute. The kizewamono genre was created by the playwright Tsuruya Namboku IV and popularized by Kawatake Mokuami.

    In Japanese: 生世話物

    Koch˘
     

    A butterfly.

    In Japanese: 胡蝶

    K˘dan
     

    A traditional form of story-telling in Japan, which began in the 17th century. While tapping a small table called a shakudai with a paper-covered folded fan, the professional storyteller relates tales of war and martial valor and the occasional ghost story in a unique tone to make the audience imagine the picture he wishes to convey.

    In Japanese: 講談

    Kodomo Shibai
     

    Troupes of Kabuki children-actors.

    In Japanese: 子供芝居

    Kod˘gu
     

    Hand-held stage properties.

    In Japanese: 小道具

    K˘ga Jisshu
     

    A special collection of roles gathered by the star Sawamura S˘jűr˘ VII and transmitted to his heirs [more details].

    In Japanese: 高賀十種

    Koito-sashichimono
     

    Kabuki dramas whose main characters are the courtesan Koito and her lover Sashichi (a fireman). Their sad love story leads to the murder of Koito by Sashichi. The most famous koito-sashichimono is "Omatsuri Sashichi".

    In Japanese: 小糸佐七物

    Koi Tsukami
     

    A spectacular giant carp-catching scene in a Kabuki drama.

    In Japanese: 鯉つかみ

    K˘ji
     

    A rice and mold mixture used to make sake [more details].

    In Japanese:

    K˘j˘
     

    Formal stage announcement. "There are often announcements from the stage, showing the close relationship between the actors and the audience in Kabuki. When the occasion is especially important, like the taking of a distinguished acting name, or commemorating the death of a great actor, the announcement becomes a separate act. The top members of the company assemble in formal costume to offer their congratulations and the audience is always delighted by this blend of kabuki style and glimpses of the private lives of their favorite actors" (from Earphone Guide website)

    In Japanese: 口上

    K˘-j˘-j˘-kichi
     

    An prestigious rank in a hy˘banki. Possible translation: meritorious - superior - superior - excellent.

    In Japanese: 功上上吉

    Koj˘ruri
     

    The old j˘jűri. All the j˘jűri done in Japan before Chikamatsu Monzaemon I's 1685 drama "Shusse Kagekiyo".
    "Puppet plays of a sort go back in Japan at least as far as the twelfth century. The puppeteers, a gipsy-like people, wandered about the country, performing at festivals and wherever else there was a demand. The plays put on were probably elementary skits, perhaps incorporating legends of the shrines where they were performed. By the seventeenth century, when the puppet theater assumed much of its modern form, moralistic plays on Buddhist themes constituted the bulk of the repertory. Most puppet plays (or j˘jűri, as they were called) before "Shusse Kagekiyo" were crudely constructed and filled with stereotyped expressions." Donald Keene in "Major Plays of Chikamatsu")

    In Japanese: 古浄瑠璃

    K˘ka
     

    An imperial era in Japanese history which started the 2nd day of the 12th lunar month of its first year (the 9th of January 1844 in the western calendar) and ended the 28th day of the 2nd lunar month of 1848 (the 1st of April 1848 in the western calendar). The 2 eras before and after K˘ka were Tenp˘ and Kaei.

    In Japanese: 弘化

    K˘ken
     

    A Kabuki actor assistant on stage. He wears formal stage dress, decorated with the mon of his master. He has to make himself as inconspicuous as possible. This is another big difference with the kurogo, who is a prominent part of the composition on the stage.

    In Japanese: 後見

    Kokera Otoshi
     

    The opening ceremony for a new Kabuki theater.

    In Japanese: 杮落し

    Kokon Shibai Irokurabe Hyakunin Isshu
     

    Title of an illustrated book, which was published in 1693. It can be translated as "Beauty Contest of One Hundred Actors of All Ages" (sources). The pictures were made by Torii Kiyonobu I. Starting with Nakamura Kanzabur˘ V and ending with Morita Kan'ya II, it listed 100 actors from Edo, ďsaka, Ky˘to or Ise.

    In Japanese: 古今四場居色競百人一首

    Kokuraj˘
     

    The Kokura Castle in Kyűshű. Built in 1602, he was in the hands of the Ogasawara clan between 1632 and 1860. It was destroyed in 1865 [more details].

    In Japanese: 小倉城

    Kokusai Kekkon
     

    International wedding (one of the spouses being Japanese). Still a hot topic in nowadays Japan. Wat˘nai's father and mother in Chikamatsu Monzaemon I's masterpiece "Kokusen'ya Gassen" were the first and only "international wedding" couple depicted in a theater drama. His father R˘ikkan was Chinese and his mother Nagisa was Japanese.

    In Japanese: 国際結婚

    Kokyű
     

    An oriental fiddle.

    In Japanese: 鼓弓

    Komori
     

    A babysitter in Old Japan.

    In Japanese: 子守

    Kompira
     

    Kompira or Kompira-san is name of a famous shrine in Japan dedicated to the God of the Mariners. The more official names are Kotohira-gű or Konpira Daigongen. It is located in the town of Kotohira in the Kagawa Prefecture on Shikoku Island, near the famous Kanamaruza theater.

    In Japanese: 金比羅

    Komus˘
     

    A wandering and mendicant Zen priest with a flute, wearing a deep sedge hat that covers the face.

    In Japanese: 虚無僧

    Konjaku Monogatari
     

    Konjaku Monogatari or Konjaku Monogatarishű. Literally the "Anthology of Tales from the Past". A collection of more than one thousand tales written during the late Heian period [more details].

    In Japanese: 今昔物語

    Konoshita T˘kichi
     

    The Kabuki role name of Kinoshita T˘kichir˘ during the Edo period. Because of strict Shogunate censorship, the playwrights had to change the names. However, the changes were quite light and the audience had no problem to understand who was who.

    In Japanese: 此下藤吉

    K˘raiya
     

    Guild name (yag˘) for the actors Matsumoto K˘shir˘, Ichikawa Komaz˘, Ichikawa Somegor˘, Matsumoto Kingo and Matsumoto K˘emon.

    In Japanese: 高麗屋

    K˘ro
     

    An incense burner.

    In Japanese: 香炉

    Koroshiba
     

    Spectacular murder scene in a Kabuki play. The most famous koroshiba is in the Kamigata play "Natsu Matsuri Naniwa Kagami".

    In Japanese: 殺し場

    Koroshi no Mie
     

    A special set of 13 fixed mie done by the actor playing the role of Danshichi Kurobei in the famous murder scene of the play "Natsu Matsuri Naniwa Kagami".

    In Japanese: 殺しの見得

    Kosan-kingor˘mono
     

    Dances or dramas whose main characters are the lovers Kosan, a bathouse girl, and Kanaya Kingor˘, an ďsaka Kabuki actor. Both really existed (Genroku era).

    In Japanese: 小三金五郎物

    K˘satsu
     

    Strangulation of a person with a rope or one's hands.

    In Japanese: 絞殺

    K˘seki
     

    A word without equivalent in English. K˘seki combines articulation, elocution and declamation.

    In Japanese: 口跡

    Koseri
     

    Medium trapdoor and lift located in the center of the stage and used to bring actors on stage. The koseri is set within the ˘seri.

    In Japanese: 小セリ

    Koshibai
     

    Minor unlicensed Kabuki Theatres. Many Edo actors started their career and gained experience at Koshibai before being accepted in the major theatres.

    In Japanese: 小芝居

    Koshimoto
     

    A lady's maid (usually a low-ranking samurai's wive in the service of a daimy˘'s wife).

    In Japanese: 腰元

    K˘shitsu
     

    A widow; a dowager.

    In Japanese: 後室

    K˘shű
     

    Old province, which grosso modo corresponds to the current prefecture of Yamanashi. It was also called Kai.

    In Japanese: 甲州

    Koto
     

    A Japanese horizontal harp.

    In Japanese:

    Kot˘
     

    Literally the "old sword". The Kot˘ period, a long period in the history of Japan swordsmanship, started in 800 and ended in 1596 [more details].

    In Japanese: 古刀

    Kouta
     

    Short ballads with shamisen, flute and percussion ensemble, which were used to accompany all kind of Kabuki dances at the end of the 17th century and the beginning of the 18th century. It was replaced by Nagauta.

    In Japanese: 小唄

    Kowakare
     

    A drama with a mother and child sad separation scene.

    In Japanese: 子別れ

    Koyaku
     

    Child role.

    In Japanese: 子役

    K˘zugű
     

    The K˘zu Shrine. A famous shrine in ďsaka (in the district of K˘zu in Chű˘-ku). It was founded in 866 and is renowned for its matsuri, which happens every 18th of July. This summer festival is part of the drama "Natsu Matsuri Naniwa Kagami".

    In Japanese: 高津宮

    K˘zuke
     

    Old province, which grosso modo corresponds to the current prefecture of Gumma. It was also called J˘shű.

    In Japanese: 上野

    Kubi jikken
     

    Inspection of the decapitated head of a samurai, a prince or a lord. The climax of many epic dramas like "Terakoya" or "Kumagai Jin'ya".

    In Japanese: 首実検

    Kubioke
     

    Standard wooden box, cylindrical in shape, used for a kubi jikken.

    In Japanese: 首桶

    Kudaime
     

    The 9th generation; the 9th holder of a name; the 9th actor in a lineage.

    In Japanese: 九代目

    Kudoki
     

    highly dramatic scene in which an onnagata actor depicts a woman's sighs, tears, love, passion or regrets for the past. Somehow the equivalent of an aria for Kabuki female roles.

    In Japanese: 口説き

    Kugeaku
     

    A noble villain in Kabuki who plots to usurp the power of the emperor.

    In Japanese: 公家悪

    Kumadori
     

    Distinctive Kabuki make-up used for aragoto roles.

    In Japanese: 隈取

    Kumamotoj˘
     

    The Castle of Kumamoto, one of the 3 most famous castles in Japan [more details].

    In Japanese: 熊本城

    Kumi Odori
     

    Kumi Wudui in Okinawan. A form of traditional musical and narrative Theatre in the Ryűkyű Islands, which was created at the beginning of the 18th century by Tamagusuku Ch˘kun (1684~1734) in Shuri, the capital of the Ryűkyű Kingdom, and was inscribed in 2010 on the UNESCO representative list of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity [more details].

    In Japanese: 組踊

    Kumosuke
     

    Unskilled laborers, colourful and unruly characters, who frequented the great highways (like the T˘kaid˘) during the Edo period.

    In Japanese: 雲助

    Kura
     

    A traditional storehouse to store treasures and others valuables.

    In Japanese:

    Kuragari T˘ge
     

    A famous pass (t˘ge) at 455m at the frontier between the Nara Prefecture and the ďsaka Prefecture.

    In Japanese: 暗峠

    Kurofune-chűemonmono
     

    Kabuki or j˘jűri dramas whose main character is the ďsaka otokodate Kurofune Chűemon, fighting against his arch-enemy Gokumon Sh˘bei. Kurofune Chűemon was based on a real life kyokaku named Nezu Shir˘emon (or Sumiyoshiya Shir˘emon) who lived and worked in ďsaka D˘jima during the H˘ei, Sh˘toku and Ky˘h˘ eras. The most famous kurofune-chűemonmono was "Kurofune Deiri Minato".

    In Japanese: 黒船忠右衛門物

    Kurogo
     

    Kabuki stage attendants completely dressed in a black costum with a san-benito look-alike black cloth covering the face, the convention for invisibility on stage. If the background is a snowy landscape, they are dressed in white. If the background is the Sea, they are dressed in blue. Their roles are multiple: they bring or remove stage props, help actors during the costums/roles changes, animate fake animals or will-o'-the-wisps... Their technical skills and efficiency are essential for the success of many stage tricks. They are also called kuromb˘ (literally black fellows). The word kurogo itself is used for either the stage assistant or his black costum.

    In Japanese: 黒衣

    Kuro Yoten
     

    One of the five main yoten costumes. "The kuro yoten is a totally black costume except for the obi, which displays a striped design on a white ground. Kuro yoten carry a metal stick called a jitte which theoretically does the work of ten hands. The implement is the symbol of the kuro yoten role: that of a policeman in jidaimono and sewamono." (Ruth Shaver in "Kabuki Costume")

    In Japanese: 黒四天

    Kurume-han
     

    An important domain in Chikugo, which was prosperous and ruled by the Arima Clan during the Edo period.

    In Japanese: 久留米藩

    Kuruwa
     

    Pleasure quarters. The most famous ones were Yoshiwara in Edo (T˘ky˘), Shinmachi in ďsaka and Shimabara in Ky˘to.

    In Japanese:

    Kusatsu-juku
     

    Kusatsu-juku or Kusatsu-shuku. The 52nd (from Edo) of the 53 shukuba (post station) on the T˘kaid˘. 465.2 km from Edo and 26 km from Ky˘to [more details].

    In Japanese: 草津宿

    Kusaz˘shi
     

    The kusaz˘shi are popular novels which heavily rely on illustrations to tell the story. They were published in Japan from the middle of the Edo period. The first kusaz˘shi writer was Ryűtei Tanehiko and his followers were Ryűtei Senka, Takahata Ransen, Okamoto Kisen, Ryűsuitei Tanekiyo, Mishina Rankei, Maeda Kosetsu or Aiba Koson.

    In Japanese: 草双子

    Kusazuribiki
     

    A bombastic tug-of-war involving Soga Gor˘ Tokimune and Kobayashi no Asahina, who pull the tassets of an armor. In the current Kabuki repertoire, the most famous play on this subject is the Nagauta-based dance-drama "Sh˘fudatsuki Kongen Kusazuri", which was staged for the first time in the 1st lunar month of 1814 at the Moritaza.

    In Japanese: 草摺引

    Kushida Kazuyoshi
     

    Born in 1942, Kushida Kazuyoshi is an actor and director. After studying in the Haiyűza actorĺs school, he joined the Bungakuza theater company in 1965. He formed with others the company Jiyű Gekij˘ (literally "Free Theater") that would use the eponymous underground theater as its performance base. In 1975 the name was changed to On-Theater Jiyű Gekij˘ and Kushida continued to present a series of popular productions. From 1985 he began working in preparation for the opening of the Bunkamura Theatre Cocoon from the architectural planning stage in the capacity of artistic director. With the opening of the theater in 1989, he signed a franchise agreement with On-Theater Jiyű Gekij˘, which he also led, and introduced a repertoire system. Since then he has worked actively on behalf of Theatre Cocoon, bringing such programs as an annual production of A Midsummer Nightĺs Dream directed by different directors each year and initiating the Cocoon Kabuki series in collaboration with Nakamura Kanzabur˘. The Cocoon Kabuki remains a popular ongoing series today. At the conclusion of his term as artistic director of Theatre Cocoon in 1996, Kushida also dissolved the company On-Theater Jiyű Gekij˘. Since 2000, he has served as a professor of the Arts Dept, of Nihon University, and since April 2003 he has served as artistic and administrative director of the Matsumoto Performing Arts Centre [more details in performingarts.jp | more details in the Japan Times].

    In Japanese: 串田和美

    Kuwana-juku
     

    Kuwana-juku or Kuwana-shuku. The 42nd (from Edo) of the 53 shukuba (post station) on the T˘kaid˘. 377.7 km from Edo and 113.5 km from Ky˘to [more details].

    In Japanese: 桑名宿

    Kuy˘
     

    A Buddhist memorial service.

    In Japanese: 供養

    Ky˘gen (1)
     

    A comical farce in the theater.

    In Japanese: 狂言

    Ky˘gen (2)
     

    A generic term for a Kabuki drama.

    In Japanese: 狂言

    Ky˘genkata
     

    A ky˘genkata used to be during the Edo period a low-ranking playwright. Nowadays, a ky˘genkata is a Kabuki stage assistant, who is dressed in black, like the black-robed kurogo. "Ky˘genkata literally means people of the play, and they perform a multitude of duties which range from prompting to wielding the hy˘shigi, or wooden clappers, when the curtain is drawn." (A. C. Scott in "The Kabuki Theatre of Japan")

    In Japanese: 狂言方

    Ky˘genshi
     

    A Ky˘gen peformer.

    In Japanese: 狂言師

    Ky˘h˘
     

    An imperial era in Japanese history which started the 22nd day of the 6th lunar month of 1716 (the 9th of August 1716 in the western calendar) and ended the 28th day of the 4th lunar month of 1736 (the 7th of June 1736 in the western calendar). The 2 eras before and after Ky˘h˘ were Sh˘toku and Genbun.

    In Japanese: 享保

    Ky˘kaku
     

    A man of chivalrous spirit; a street knight.

    In Japanese: 侠客

    Kyoku-j˘-j˘-kichi
     

    An important, prestigious and rare rank in a hy˘banki. Possible translation: fast - superior - superior - excellent.

    In Japanese: 亟上上吉

    Ky˘ran
     

    A state of madness in a dance. The main character is frantically searching for somebody (a lover, a lost child) in a dazed state. The dance describes his/her mental disorder.

    In Japanese: 狂乱

    Ky˘ranmono
     

    Dramas or dances dealing with ky˘ran. The most famous ones are "Onatsu Ky˘ran", "Yasuna", "Sumidagawa" and "Ninin Wankyű".

    In Japanese: 狂乱物

    Ky˘wa
     

    An imperial era in Japanese history which started the 5th day of the 2nd lunar month of 1801 (the 19th of March 1801 in the western calendar) and ended the 11th day of the 2nd lunar month of 1804 (the 22nd of March 1804 in the western calendar). The 2 eras before and after Ky˘wa were Kansei and Bunka.

    In Japanese: 享和

    Ky˘ya
     

    Guild name (yag˘) for the actors Nakamura Jakuemon, Nakamura Ky˘z˘ and Nakamura Shibajaku.

    In Japanese: 京屋

     
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